Resist the Culture

Cultural Resistance: A way to break from the habitual assumptions, patterns, beliefs, and processes that saturate everyday life by using the content and mediums of culture to create new meanings, language, practices, and visions of the future. People resist the culture using art, music, memes, and just about any cultural form.

Example 1, Collage Art

BELLA THE TRUTHTELLER is a collection of Collage Art that evolved from the brochures and magazines of an oncology waiting room. Within these patient care materials, breast cancer is presented as a meaningful learning experience; treatment is something to endure before getting back to “normal” (i.e., being “cured”); metastatic breast cancer is a “chronic condition” instead of an ultimate cause of death; breast cancer patients are a consumer base for corporations; pink products flourish; and survivorship focuses on looking so good no one can tell you’re being treated for breast cancer. Refusing to quell her anger, Bella gives voice to aspects of the breast cancer experience that pink ribbon culture sanitizes away.

Intended to “stir thought and bring out the TRUTHteller in all of us,” here are three collages from the 2011 Collection by BELLA THE TRUTHTELLER:

  1. “Coping With the Language of Breast Cancer Culture.”
  2. “Breast Cancer: The Simulated Reality.”
  3. “I’m Angry. Now What?”




Example 2, Memes

Memes are rebellious, comedic, and potentially subversive examples of cultural resistance. If they get the attention — even briefly — of many many people they have the capacity to disrupt norms and bring valuable ideas into the collective consciousness. The meme below, which came from a blogger called “the sarcastic boob,” points to the fact that information about metastatic breast cancer (sometimes called stage IV) does not have the mass appeal necessary for inclusion in mainstream breast cancer awareness campaigns.


Resistance to the overwhelming visibility of pink ribbon culture comes from a variety of places, including other health social movements.


Source: via Michelle on Pinterest


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