The Teal before the Pink: Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Pinking the White House for Breast Cancer Awareness

Note: A version of this essay was published on Pink Ribbon Blues and republished on the Oxford University Press Blog on September 30, 2011. And it’s still applicable.

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. Will the White House be lighted in teal just as it’s been lighted in pink to commemorate National Breast Cancer Awareness Month? Will grocery stores line shelves with teal ribbon products? Will schools give out teal t-shirts or pins? Probably . . . → Read More: The Teal before the Pink: Ovarian Cancer Awareness

Every Silver Lining Has A Cloud

Cumulus Clouds: www.carlwozniak.com

Much of my life revolves around cancer, both professionally and personally. My ongoing research of breast cancer culture and industry that started over a decade ago entails an immersion into the topic that involves incessant reading of medical studies, news articles, advocacy materials, public policies, and personal stories as well as systematic observation, interviewing, writing, and networking. It is my everyday work. Cancer also permeates my personal life. Many of my colleagues over the years and some of my closest friends . . . → Read More: Every Silver Lining Has A Cloud

National Young Adult Cancer Awareness Week (April 3-9)

The intensive public focus on pink ribbon awareness campaigns not only diminishes deep awareness about the realities of breast cancer. It also diminishes general awareness of other health conditions, including other types of cancers and populations of women and men who have unique needs when they are diagnosed and treated.

National Young Adult Cancer Awareness Week (April 3-9), first launched in 2003, is designed to share little known information about young adults with cancer. This year, a series of video public service announcements reveals that:

Approximately 70,000 . . . → Read More: National Young Adult Cancer Awareness Week (April 3-9)

Economic Interests

Writing to you from the Texas Book Festival in Austin.

The post on the Birth of the Perpetual Fundraising Industry prompted Anna, diagnosed with breast cancer at age 33, to ask a vital question. She writes:

“The vested interests in my continuing decline in health are staggering and frightening.

But if we’re talking about this from a economic perspective, here is my question. If all the people afflicted with breast (and other) cancers were magically cured, with no further treatment . . . → Read More: Economic Interests

2020: NBCC’s Breast Cancer Deadline

The National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC) has worked for years to promote evidence-based medicine and to ensure that scientific information about breast cancer reaches women, informs policy, and impacts the direction of research. On September 20th NBCC raised the stakes. The coalition set a deadline to end breast cancer by 2020. Eradication is the goal.

The eradication of breast cancer is not a new idea. Numerous breast cancer organizations, research programs, treatment centers, and policy agendas have mission statements that specify cure(s), or the . . . → Read More: 2020: NBCC’s Breast Cancer Deadline

What We Could Learn From George Burns About Breast Cancer Risk

Making sense of one’s personal risk for developing a disease is complicated. In fact, it’s virtually impossible. We all know of lifetime smokers who never get lung cancer and nonsmokers who do. While there is a strong probability that smoking causes lung cancer, the smoking-lung cancer equation is not definitive for all individuals. There is a clear and documented relationship, however, between smoking and negative health outcomes. In general people who smoke do have an increased risk of developing lung cancer compared to those . . . → Read More: What We Could Learn From George Burns About Breast Cancer Risk

Thinking the Unthinkable

In “1 in 8”: The Probability of Developing Breast Cancer, and Fear, I wrote about the overuse of incidence and mortality statistics to promote an unhealthy anxiousness about breast cancer. The hyper-alertness surrounding this particular type of cancer stems from the seemingly inevitable likelihood that a woman, any woman, will eventually develop the disease. This is simply not true. Seven out of eight women will eventually die from something besides breast cancer, maybe even old age. But the threat of breast cancer, the statistics, . . . → Read More: Thinking the Unthinkable

“1 in 8” – Fear Mongering and the Probability of Developing Breast Cancer

Every year, over 700 thousand women in the United States are diagnosed with some type of cancer. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and is the second leading cause of cancer death (after lung cancer). In 2009, the American Cancer Society estimated over 192 thousand new cases of breast cancer among women and over 40 thousand deaths. Although 80 percent of new breast cancer cases were in women over age fifty, a growing number were diagnosed at earlier ages. Nearly . . . → Read More: “1 in 8” – Fear Mongering and the Probability of Developing Breast Cancer

“Pink Ribbon Blues,” Book

Paperback includes new Introduction on fundraising controversies and color insert with images of, and reactions to, the pinking of breast cancer (2012).


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Recent Sulik Interviews

A Year After Bombings, Some Say 'Boston Strong' Has Gone Overboard NPR, All Things Considered

Canadian Mammogram Study KCRW, NPR Affiliate

Breast Cancer: Awareness, Activism & Pinkwashing NPR Charlotte

Buying Pink Al Jazeera's The Stream Watch »

The Pink Backlash Orlando Sentinel

Preventative Mastectomies: Disease and Deception Listen to BlogTalkRadio »

Angelina Jolie and the 'Breast Cancer Gene' Listen to KCRW »

Our Feel-Good War on Breast Cancer. The New York Times Magazine.

The Story Behind the Pink Ribbon Campaign Sisters Talk Radio

WISH Interview Women's International Summit for Health

Making Cancer About The Patient, Not The Body Part CBS Pittsburgh

Sexy breast cancer campaigns anger many patients USA Today

The perils of pink The Daily

Komen pink campaign creates breast-cancer blues for some Dallas Morning News

A yellow flag for the NFL's pink New York Daily

Gayle Sulik named #7 in SharecareNow’s Top 10 Online Influencers in Breast Cancer

"Breast cancer cancer causes so easily derailed" Philly Inquirer

"Komen Charity Under Microscope for Funding, Science" Reuters

"The Fight Against Cancer - And Abortion? Salon.com

"Susan G. Komen For the Cure defunds Planned Parenthood." In Deep with Angie Coiro

"Amid Breast Cancer Month, Is there Pink Fatigue?" NPR's All Things Considered

"How is Breast Cancer Culture Undermining Women's Health?" America’s Radio News Network

"Pink Ribbon Culture and Breast Cancer" The Kojo Nnamdi Show

"The Big Business of Breast Cancer" 
Marie Claire

"Does Breast Cancer Awareness Month Crowd Out Other Diseases?" Slate

"Pink Inc. Has Many Starting to See Red" The Sacramento Bee

"Get Your Pink Off" Ottawa Citizen

"Komen Pink Ribbons Raise Green and Questions" USA Today

** MORE MEDIA LINKS **
** MORE RADIO INTERVIEWS **